September 24, 2021

Professional Academic Society to Offer Graduate Credit by University of St. Thomas for Adjunct Faculty Certification Program

CHICAGO, Ill., August 10, 2009 — SoCAFE, The Society of Certified Adjunct Faculty Educators, announced today that the organization’s certification program for part-time college and university faculty would now be available for graduate credit by the University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, MN.

Completion of the certification course, entitled “Core Competencies of College Teaching” (CTED 672), will earn three graduate hours of credit and award the Certified Adjunct Faculty Educator (C.A.F.E.) designation.

“We’re gratified by the confidence St. Thomas University has shown in the quality of our certification program by offering it for graduate credit. This may be an excellent time for K-12 teachers to consider registering for this course, given the widespread lay-offs of public school teachers around the country,” said Dr. Rochelle Santopoalo, President of SoCAFE.

SoCAFE is the first organization in the United States to provide a portable, national credential for adjunct faculty in American colleges and universities.

Dr. Santopoalo also stated that “while the number of opportunities for K-12 teachers is currently in decline, according to the 2008-2009 edition of U.S. Department of Labor Handbook, the number of college and university teaching jobs is expected to grow by 23 percent between 2006 and 2016 – much faster than the average for all occupations.”

Founded in 1885, the University of St. Thomas is the largest private university in Minnesota. St. Thomas offers bachelor’s degrees in over 85 major fields of study and more than 45 graduate degree programs including master’s, education specialist, juris doctor and doctorates. (University of St. Thomas website: www.stthomas.edu/education/ce).

For more information on the organization visit: http://www.socafe.org.

All trademarks and service marks are the property of The Society of Certified Adjunct Faculty Educators.

commercial career colleges have more success graduating high-risk students than do other types of institutions

For those of us in the industry this is no surprise…  We hope other take notice of these FACTS and begin to value the role of the for profits withing the education industry.

Click on the link to read the article at inside highered: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/06/18/career

DOE looking to shorten FASFA form

Wow, we like good news and this can be good news.  While I was working at a school I cant help but remember how much difficulty people had with the fasfa forms.  It was almost like an entrance exam or sorts.  Finally it looks like to Govt. is doing something that will actually result in more people going to college.  Read it here: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124580161498344673.html

Department of Education Conference Call

Department of Education Conference Call

The (DOE) Department of Education held a conference call on Friday that didn’t really clarify any potential upcoming regulatory changes.

Deputy Undersecretary Robert Shireman basically repeated what was published in The Federal Register.

In essence they intend to convene a committee to develop & propose regulations to maintain and/ or improve program integrity in the Title IV, HEA programs

Shireman did not explain the specific reasons which prompted these meetings, other than wanting students to

have access to college and good quality post-secondary education that serves

students and taxpayers.  He stated a couple of times that the DOE wanted and is seeking input regarding potential changes

The real question is: Is this a lead in opportunity for the Obama administration to come up with significant changes with the ability to say that they were proposed to them rather than taking ownership of leading the charge? 

The good news is that Shireman did not attack the utility of for-profit institutions or their role in providing quality education.

He basically said that there are effective schools and less-effective schools in every sector, so the focus needs to be on quality regardless of sector.

April search volume holding strong

Check out the April search volume: http://www.forprofitedu.com/marketing-firms/search-volume/april-2009-search-volume/

Educational Attainment of the Population 18 Years and Over, by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin: 2008

             
Table 1.  Educational Attainment of the Population 18 Years and Over, by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin:  2008          
(Numbers in thousands.  Civilian noninstitutionalized population /1.)            
                     
All Races Educational Attainment              
  Total None High school graduate Some college no degree Associate’s , occupational Associate’s, academic Bachelor’s  Master’s  Professional  Doctoral 
Both Sexes                    
.18 years and over 224,703 824 69,480 44,168 9,016 9,573 40,070 14,893 3,009 2,485
..18 to 24 years 28,398 47 8,296 10,356 608 799 2,511 128 17 14
.25 years and over 196,305 776 61,183 33,812 8,408 8,774 37,559 14,765 2,991 2,472
..25 to 29 years 21,057 30 6,017 4,109 834 1,054 5,012 1,227 181 57
..30 to 34 years 19,089 40 5,280 3,287 873 956 4,409 1,565 309 210
..35 to 39 years 20,733 40 5,586 3,623 967 1,072 4,695 1,865 375 268
..40 to 44 years 21,399 68 6,454 3,576 1,054 1,065 4,509 1,641 318 270
..45 to 49 years 22,701 84 7,297 4,021 1,138 1,140 4,380 1,592 349 282
..50 to 54 years 21,234 106 6,772 3,661 1,078 1,107 4,051 1,689 395 245
..55 to 59 years 18,371 74 5,589 3,302 844 900 3,462 1,679 344 316
..60 to 64 years 14,931 69 4,632 2,710 603 619 2,634 1,377 268 289
..65 to 69 years 11,165 61 3,904 1,844 379 335 1,568 842 155 231
..70 to 74 years 8,423 79 3,095 1,262 231 221 1,063 514 92 133
..75 years and over 17,202 126 6,560 2,417 406 305 1,776 773 206 172
Male
.18 years and over 108,862 396 34,048 20,735 4,111 3,980 19,102 6,920 1,888 1,631
..18 to 24 years 14,392 29 4,557 4,925 268 387 1,060 34 11 3
.25 years and over 94,470 367 29,491 15,810 3,843 3,593 18,042 6,886 1,877 1,628
..25 to 29 years 10,721 16 3,423 2,058 417 432 2,305 475 69 24
..30 to 34 years 9,489 17 2,933 1,539 407 423 2,060 623 150 110
..35 to 39 years 10,291 20 3,004 1,844 433 454 2,170 819 213 152
..40 to 44 years 10,589 43 3,387 1,620 503 404 2,082 790 186 172
..45 to 49 years 11,165 49 3,796 1,803 514 428 2,034 789 214 196
..50 to 54 years 10,374 65 3,438 1,751 509 448 1,931 691 266 155
..55 to 59 years 8,929 39 2,462 1,609 390 401 1,784 830 244 206
..60 to 64 years 7,150 22 2,002 1,261 289 287 1,398 703 186 199
..65 to 69 years 5,238 23 1,606 824 171 155 841 452 122 180
..70 to 74 years 3,740 31 1,156 537 98 92 570 291 74 100
..75 years and over 6,785 40 2,283 965 112 68 868 422 155 134
Female
.18 years and over 115,841 427 35,432 23,433 4,905 5,593 20,968 7,973 1,121 855
..18 to 24 years 14,006 18 3,740 5,431 340 412 1,451 94 7 11
.25 years and over 101,835 409 31,692 18,002 4,565 5,181 19,517 7,879 1,114 844
..25 to 29 years 10,337 14 2,594 2,051 417 622 2,708 752 112 33
..30 to 34 years 9,600 23 2,347 1,747 466 533 2,349 942 158 100
..35 to 39 years 10,442 20 2,582 1,779 534 619 2,526 1,046 163 116
..40 to 44 years 10,810 24 3,067 1,957 551 661 2,427 852 133 99
..45 to 49 years 11,536 35 3,501 2,219 625 712 2,346 803 136 86
..50 to 54 years 10,860 41 3,333 1,909 569 659 2,120 998 129 90
..55 to 59 years 9,442 34 3,126 1,693 454 499 1,678 849 100 110
..60 to 64 years 7,781 47 2,630 1,449 314 332 1,236 674 82 90
..65 to 69 years 5,928 37 2,297 1,020 208 180 727 390 33 51
..70 to 74 years 4,683 48 1,939 725 133 129 493 222 18 33
..75 years and over 10,417 86 4,277 1,452 295 236 908 351 51 38
Footnotes:                    
A dash (-) represents zero or rounds to zero.              
/1 Plus armed forces living off post or with their families on post.              
/2 12th grade no diploma are included in this category.              
                     
Source:  U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, 2008 Annual Social and Economic Supplement          
Internet Release date:  April 2009                
                     

Link to data: http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/education/cps2008.html